PRODUCT INFORMATION


Dietary Benefit
Ascorbigen helps the body prevent absorption
of toxins through the small and large intestines
[1] and exhibits provitamin [2-6], immunostimu-
latory [3-6], and skin conditioning properties [7]. Ascorbigen’s usefulness is largely attributed to
its ability to support the body’s natural metabolism
of hormones and promote good estrogen (2-Hydroxyestrone) [9].

Dosage
Adults 200 to 400 mg per day.
Children may take up to 1/2 adult dosage.

Product Overview
Ascorbigen is the most prevalent of several
Dietary Indoles shown to have significant physi-
ological activity [13] and may be the essential
component making Dietary Indoles beneficial [14]. Ascorbigen is a skin-permeable form of Vitamin C
formed from Indole-3-Carbinol in the presence of
aqueous ascorbic acid.

Ascorbigen is produced naturally in cruciferous
vegetable juices when cell walls are broken through chopping, chewing, or juicing* [15]. First identified
in 1935 [16], Ascorbigen was isolated from Savoy
cabbage juice in 1957 [17]. Ascorbigen may exhibit synergy with Indole-3-Carbinol [18-19].

Stability
Ascorbigen is the most stable of commercially
available Dietary Indoles. It requires neither refriger-
ation nor protection from light. Degradation will
occur at temperatures in excess of 50ºC. Trace
amounts of more reactive Dietary Indoles contribute
to product color.

Alternate Names
2-C-(1H-Indol-3-ylmethyl)-ß-L-lyxo-3-hex-
ulofuranosonic acid g-lactone.




Classification

Dietary Indole CAS Registry Number [8075-98-7]

Regulatory Status
Ascorbigen is a dietary supplement under provisions of US Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA).

Warning
Amounts in excess of recommended dosages may cause diarrhea.

References
1. McDanell, R. et al. 1987 Food and Chemical Toxicology 25: 363-368.
2. Bukin, Y.V. et al. 1987 Khimi IA 13: 539-545.
3. Mukhanov, V.I. et al. 1984 Soviet Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry 10: 544-559.
4. Plikhtyak, I.L. et al. 1988 Khim. Getcrotsikl. Sosdin.131-132
5. Efimox, S.A., 1989 Antibiot. Khimioter 34: 125-129.
6. Anonymous, 1978 Analysis and Research (Japan)
16: 546-550.
7. Fukushima, S., Toyoda, H., 1987 Japan Kokai Tokyo Koho Japanese patent. 62/155204 A2 [87/155204] July 10.
8. Andrus, G.M., Arffman, K., 1999 United States Patent. 5895787, April 20.
9. Michnovicz, J. J.; Bradlow, H. L. 1991 Nutr. Cancer
16: 59-66. Michnovicz, J. J.; Bradlow, H. L. 1990, Natl. Can. Inst. 82: 947-949
10. Sepkovic, D. et al. 1994 Steroids 59: 318-323.
11. Bell, M.C. et al. 2000, Gynecologic Oncology 78: 123-129.
12. Newfield, L. et al. 1993, Anticancer Research 13: 337-342.
13. Loub, W.E., Wattenberg, L.W., Davis, D.W., 1975 J. Nat. Can. Inst. 54: 985-988.
14. Preobrazhenskaya, M. N. andKorolev, A.M. 1992 Journal of the National Cancer Institute 84: 15, 1210-1211
15. Zeligs, M.A., 1998 Journal of Medicinal Food 1:2, 67-82
16. Ahmad, B., 1935 Biochemistry Journal 29: 275
17. Prochazka, Z. et al. Collection of Czechoslovakian 1957 Chemical Communications 22: 333, 654
18. Chinoy, N.J., 1977 Journal of Animal Morphology and Physiology 24: 173-185.
19. Kahatriya, A.M., 1977 Journal of Animal Morphology and Physiology 24: 379-386.

* While this compound occurs naturally, they exist in extremely low quantities. All commercial sources are synthetic.



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